The Jesuits

Twas the week before Christmas…

The University of Scranton’s President, Scott R. Pilarz, S.J., has released a message on the University’s Website and in an email to the University Community regarding the Maryland Province releasing the names of Jesuits credibly accused of sexual abuse of minors. As Father Pilarz points out, four of the Jesuits named have been associated with the University of Scranton, and other Jesuit run schools within the Diocese.  The statement of the Maryland Province may be found here.

All of these predators were included in the Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report.  Father Pilarz addressed one of these predators, Neil P.McLaughlin S.J. back in 2010. (I wrote about it eight years ago, almost to the day.)  You can find McLaughlin’s record of assignments at this link: Bishop Accountability.com.  McLaughlin falls off the earth with the Jesuits in 2010 in the Jesuit Directory.  Perhaps they were hiding him?

Father Pilarz recommends that anyone who has been victimized by a Jesuit   “contact the Victim Advocacy Coordinator at 443-370-6357 or at MARadvocacy@jesuits.org, and appropriate law-enforcement and child-protective agencies.”

I strongly recommend you forego notifying the “Victim Advocacy Coordinator.”  They are not there to help victims, they are there to identify threats to the order.  “Victim Advocacy Coordinator helped me get the help and support I needed,” said no victim of sexual crimes by Catholic priests ever!  The VAC is there to start the initial risk assessment to the church, or religious order, and to begin the process of isolating and intimidating victims, their families and anyone that supports them.  You can call me paranoid, but this has been my personal experience, and other survivors have told me the same story over and over again.

hotline_poster2-300x240If you have been victimized by a Jesuit, call law enforcement, contact the district attorney’s office in the jurisdiction where the crimes took place.  <<<<<Contact the PA Attorney General’s Hotline.

I have no reason, at this point,  to believe that Father Pilarz is not sincere.   After ten years of writing on this blog, I will tell you that the fastest way to come to a dead stop is to trust the church to do the right thing.  (The truth is harsh at times.)

Report to civil authorities and find competent legal counsel who will look after you and your interests.  The Catholic Church, its orders and its institutions, will undoubtedly be looking out for their own interests.

One final note on today’s blog.   In good faith (there is that word again), I composed a letter to the President of the University of Scranton in November concerning his Task Force on Healing Reconciliation and Hope.  I sent copies to the two University Professors who co-chair this Task Force. To date, I have not heard a word from either the President of the University or the Task Force acknowledging my correspondence.  In his defense, Father Pilarz did have quite a few Alumni Christmas Events to attend all over the mid-Atlantic this holiday season.

You can read my letter to the President of the “U” here. 

An Open Letter to the President of the University of Scranton

Father Scott R. Pilarz, S.J.,

The recent acknowledgment of credible allegations of sexual predation by Neil McLaughlin, S.J., a Jesuit with ties to the University of Scranton, is tragic for his victims as well as the University of Scranton.  It is conceivable that his victims could include members of the University of Scranton community.

As President of the University of Scranton, you have an opportunity to use this tragic news to educate the university community, as well as  surrounding communities, on the epidemic of sexual crimes committed against children in our society. You can show your commitment to the truth and rise above diocesan rhetoric of denial and re-victimization to open a meaningful dialogue with the survivor community.

I hope you use this moment in the University’s history to openly discuss the problems of sexual crimes committed by clergy in the Catholic Church. Such a discussion could bring together survivors, civil authorities, church representatives and the Catholic Community to openly address the crisis. As the President of a prestigious Catholic University you have the opportunity and the obligation to further discuss the crisis, especially in light of the revelation that a credibly accused predator once enjoyed a position of trust and respect at the University of Scranton.

I hope you don’t add your name to the long list of people who issue a statement and then never acknowledge the crisis again.  I would like to think that the University of Scranton is still a place where real issues are discussed openly and all voices are heard.  Prayer is good, especially when it accompanies action.

Michael Baumann

Class of 1982