Allocution

It is done.  I have spent hours filling out the ISCP questionnaire from the Diocese of Scranton.  Despite the documentation already provided and the written acknowledgment from the Chancery,  I had to answer the following questions:

  • Where did the abuse occur? I provided a list.
  • Age when first sexually abused? Thirteen
michael-teen1
Michael at 13
  • When did the abuse occur?
  • On approximately how many occasions were you sexually abused?  
  • To the best of your ability, describe the nature of the sexual abuse
  • Did you receive a prior Financial Settlement from the Diocese? 
  • Do you currently have a civil lawsuit against the Diocese? 
  • Did anyone witness the abuse or circumstances surrounding the abuse?
  • To the best of your ability, please describe the impact (emotional, spiritual, financial, etc.) you believe the abuse had on you:
Father Robert J. Gibson
Robert Gibson

This questionnaire is flawed.  It is focused on a specific parish.  I had to color outside of the lines because Robert Gibson was not my parish priest.  He was my 8th-grade religion teacher at Notre Dame Jr/Sr High School in East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania.  Gibson was a faculty advisor for the play done by the junior high school that year.  He was the priest advising my mother with her marital difficulties.  There was no alternative to the parish question.  So I inserted the school information.  I imagine some survivors would need to put the Fatima Retreat Center or one of the camps run by the Diocese in the past. I described his cars, the temporary rectory at Our Lady Queen of Peace in Brodheadsville he occupied while the ridiculously large permanent rectory was under construction in 1974.  I described the threats, the abuse, the physical violence.  Nine pages, single spaced, recounting the repeated manipulations, being taken across state lines and the amount of booze he would consume to get his courage up.  Fortunately, at times, the alcohol would only allow his courage to get up.

 

It took me months to get this all down in a Word file.  For months I felt like I was getting pulled through the keyhole.  This questionnaire was designed to make survivors relive sexual abuse again.  They probably intended it to make survivors give up in frustration.  I know I walked away from it on more than one occasion. Now that I am done with this and my team in Harrisburg is editing and formatting and adding potentially hundreds of pages of documents, emails, and blog posts.

The Diocese is not required to fill out any paperwork of which I am aware.  The Bishops will not have consequences to deal with, no matter what offer comes my way from Mr. Feinberg and Ms. Biros, the “independent administrators of the ISCP.”  After all, the money will come either directly or indirectly from the parishioners in the Diocese of Scranton.  If you are buying Bishop Bambera’s particular flavor of  B.S., the money will come from donations to pay survivors off.  I guess the taste doesn’t matter, it is still just B.S.  There are things I want to know.  I know I will not get the truth from Bishop Bambera or the Diocese of Scranton.  As a Catholic prelate, Joseph Bambera is incapable of telling the truth.

So here are my questions for the bishop and Diocese of Scranton:

  • Why was protecting Robert Gibson or any of the other priests who enjoyed the protection of the Diocese more important that children?
  • What gives the Bishop and his minions the right to circumvent the law and endanger the most innocent of your parishioners?
  • How much of the parishioner’s money have you spent over the years to:
    • Buy the silence of victims and their families
    • Pay lawyers to intimidate, demean and silence victims
    • Pay lobbyist to derail legislation designed to protect children and vulnerable adults and hold predators and the institutions that protect them
    • Pay child support for children fathered by priests (the next crisis in the wings)
    • Pay for abortions for women impregnated by priests
    • Buy silence to prevent the release of information about priests arrested in prostitution stings or to silence gay lovers

These are questions that will not be answered.  Well, at least in the short term.  The only people required to allocute are the survivors or the families of the victims that are no longer with us.  There is really no justice in this process.  When it comes right down to it, everyone loses except the bishops and their henchmen.

There may be some hope still.  The Church Militant is forming an “Action Arm” to go after the criminal and immoral action of the bishops.  Their goal:

Church Militant is happy to announce — excited to announce — the launch of what we are calling the Church Militant Action Arm, a broad-based effort to get the goods on these rotten men through secret investigations where we turn over what we unearth to law enforcement and help police and prosecutors get these Judases out of office.

The goal is to provide absolute anonymity for whistleblowers in dioceses all over the country who are sick to death of participating in all this evil.

Click on the link and watch the video.  If you are a Chancery employee or anyone with information, get in touch with these people  I may have to throw some money at this effort!

While I tend to avoid conservative Catholics because of the vitriol they have thrown my way for the past dozen years, I find this concept to be intriguing.  I am all for exposing the men in the red and purple vestments for what they truly are, Roman Collar Criminals.

For now, I will wait for the folks in Washington managing the ISCP to get back to me.  As with anything concerning the Diocese of Scranton, I will assume the worst and watch as they get away unscathed.

 

 

 

Mother’s Day Weekend update from the Diocese of Scranton

The email has been pinging again.  It seems that the Diocese has announced that they have paid out $2.2 Million to “abuse victims” in the first 90 days of the Individual Survivor Compensation Program.  (David Singleton. May 11, 2019. The Times-Tribune: Diocese of Scranton pays $2.2M to abuse victims in first 90 days of program)

How nice to let the mothers of the Diocese of Scranton know, on this their special weekend,  that the Bishop/Diocese are paying pennies on the dollar for sex crimes committed against their children.  I hope you are pleased that they see this as a good thing and not for what it is,  a horror story.

I have heard from other survivors about the struggle to document the abuse, the stress of having to put the details of the sexual offenses committed against them by priests who used their position to perpetrate these crimes and the cover of the bishop’s office with all the minions in line to avoid scandal.  Never mind that they all failed, including the incumbent, Joseph Bambera, to protect children.  They failed to do the right thing.  They failed to uphold the basic tenants of the religion in which they placed their faith and took vows to live their lives by the teachings of their savior.

I have not submitted a claim as of the date this post will be published.  I am finding it challenging to sit and write out the details of the sexual violations committed against me by Robert Gibson.   You may recall that Gibson is the infamous “Father Ned” returned to a parish by Joseph Bambera at the order of Bishop Timlin.  I don’t see this ISCP as long-awaited justice. I still think this is just a way for the Diocese of Scranton to pay minimal compensation to a large number of survivors to make this go away.  As if it will ever go away.

The parishioners of the Diocese of Scranton should be demanding answers to questions on where the money for the program comes from.  Why is the Diocese spinning this as a successful program?  It seems to be a successful coverup. Why are the parishioners still in pews, still tithing, still believing that the problem is not that big a deal?  Why don’t they get it.?

It strikes me as odd that men who preach that all will stand in front of their god in judgment, behave in a manner contrary to their everlasting salvation.  I see this as an indicator that this is all smoke and mirrors.  They continue to act in a fashion that indicates their own disbelief in a higher power’s justice.  Perhaps they believe their collar makes them immune.  Think about it.

 

Tetherow’s Story Continues

 

Tetherow
“Father” Tetherow, convicted felon

The York Daily Record released a story on Virgil Bradley Tertherow, one of the convicted priests who was listed in the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s Grand Jury Report (his story is covered on page 872 in the Diocese of Scranton section).

By the looks of the number of search engine inquiries and hits on my collection of posts on this particularly creepy con artist, there is a renewed interest in this collector of child pornography.  A man continually changing his name and denying his felony conviction is an indicator of something, isn’t it?

He is still operating as a “Priest” in a “Traditional Rite Catholic Church Cult called the “Saint Michael the Archangel Roman Catholic Church” in Lower Windsor Township where he is going by the name “Father Gabriel.”  There a delusional congregation has swallowed his ridiculous story of how he was set up because of his adherence to the Traditional Latin Mass. They have a FaceBook group that is full of pictures of this rogue “priest.”    These people are in denial despite the overwhelming evidence of this man’s guilt to include copies of official court records and his own admission of guilt.  Bishop James Timlin gave this man his first opportunity to operate in the Diocese of Scranton.

This is a particularly unsettling article. You may want to shower after reading it!

I am looking forward to the next slug of hate mail from his cult supporters in Central Pennsylvania.

The number for calling the rectory of his church is (717) 758-3947.

The University of Scranton Takes Action

US_Seal_3DA letter by was released by the President of the University of Scranton, Scott R. Pilarz, S.J., to the University on August 20, 2018, concerning the Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report.  It outlines proactive steps being implemented at the  “The U” as a result of the findings presented by the Grand Jury.  Some of the actions include the renaming of buildings named after bishops in Scranton implicated in the report as covering up abuses and rescinding honorary degrees conferred on those bishops.  The text of the letter is as follows:

Dear Members of the University Community,

 The recent release of more than 1,300 pages of grand jury proceedings detailing sexual abuse by Catholic priests in Pennsylvania and failures by Church leaders in responding to these situations is justifiably generating international attention and outrage. Since the report’s release last week, the University has considered how best to respond to the deeply disturbing report and to past honors and recognition it has bestowed upon individuals named in it.

Earlier today, I consulted with a group of administrators, faculty, alumni and student leaders to recommend a course of action to the Board of Trustees. This afternoon, the Board met in special session and unanimously approved our recommendations.

With sympathy for and in solidarity with victims of sexual abuse in the Diocese of Scranton, The University of Scranton will rescind honorary degrees and rename campus buildings recognizing Bishops Jerome D. Hannan, J. Carroll McCormick, and James C. Timlin. As documented in the report, these Bishops covered up the crimes and misdeeds of men who were under their jurisdiction and placed children in harm’s way.

Buildings previously named for these three Bishops will be renamed as follows:

McCormick Hall will be renamed MacKillop Hall in honor of Saint Mary of the Cross MacKillop, an Australian nun who founded the Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Sacred Heart and who publicly exposed the sexual abuse of children by a priest. In her life, she faced persecution and excommunication, during which she was assisted by the Jesuits until later being absolved. Pope Benedict XVI named Sr. Mary Australia’s first saint in 2010.

The name on Timlin House will be removed and Mulberry Plaza, the complex in which the building is located, will be renamed Romero Plaza in honor of the late Oscar Romero, Archbishop of San Salvador, who will be canonized by Pope Francis on October 14. Murdered in 1980 while saying mass in San Salvador, Archbishop Romero remains an inspiration to millions, including many on the University’s campus who have made the moving pilgrimage to El Salvador.

Hannan Hall will be renamed Giblin-Kelly Hall in honor of the late Brendan J. Giblin ’06 and William H. Kelly Jr. ’93.  Brendan was a graduating senior at Scranton and o-captain of the swim team when he was tragically killed while on Spring Break in Panama City.  Bill worked for Bloomberg, LP in Princeton, N.J. and their affiliate, Bloomberg Tradebook LLC, in New York City. On September 11, 2001, Bill attended a conference at Windows on the World at the World Trade Center, Tower One, and was killed in the attack that destroyed those buildings. Since Bill and Brendan died, their family and friends have devotedly kept their memory alive, transforming tragedy into good in support of future students at Scranton.

In choosing to honor St. MacKillop, Archbishop Romero, Brendan and Bill, we hold up the example of their lives as a reminder always to be a voice against abuse and violence no matter the cost, to champion the poor and oppressed, and to treasure the bonds of friendship and community that are at the heart of The University of Scranton.

These actions are important, but the gravity of the information we now know demands even more of us. As a Catholic and Jesuit university founded by the Diocese of Scranton, The University of Scranton will strive together with the people of the Diocese and Catholics everywhere to address the difficult but necessary questions that arise from the grand jury report. As a university community, we look forward to working with the people of the Diocese to assist in facilitating discussions and reflection in the long but hopeful process to rebuild trust and find peace. In support of this initiative, the University is devoting resources to advance the programs and projects that emerge from our collaboration.

Additionally, I recognize that stories from the past two weeks can trigger painful memories for members of our campus community who themselves are living with the lifelong scars of sexual abuse. Please be assured that the staff of the Counseling Center and Campus Ministries are available to help students and that the University’s employee assistance program is always available for faculty and staff.

On this journey, I ask that you pray for the healing of all victims of sexual abuse and their families and that you pray also for the people of the Diocese of Scranton and the Universal Church.

Sincerely,

Scott R. Pilarz, S.J.

President

For the first time since a lengthy confession with Edward Gannon, S.J. in his library office at the University of Scranton in 1981, I feel a little bit of the weight being taken off of me.

This is a significant start to an open dialogue on the depths of the problem of covering up sexual crimes committed against children and a way forward to protect children and vulnerable adults in the future.

As a member of both the University of Scranton and the Survivor community, I am proud of my university for taking these initial decisive steps.

Michael Baumann, ’82